Her's

Both members of the British indie duo Her's were killed in a wreck in La Paz County on Wednesday.

LONDON  — The victims of Wednesday's wrong-way car crash in La Paz County were members of the British indie duo Her's, according to the band's record label.

The label, Heist or Hit, said in a news release that Stephen Fitzpatrick and Audun Laading of the Liverpool-based band died alongside their tour manager, Trevor Engelbrektson in a collision on Interstate 10 near Salome. 

They had performed in Phoenix, Arizona and were driving to a show in Santa Ana, California.

DPS spokesman Trooper Kameron Lee said a wrong-way driver on westbound I-10 was reported shortly after 1 a.m. Wednesday While DPS Troopers and La Paz County Sheriff’s Deputies were responding, a Nissan pickup truck collided head-on with the  15-passenger Ford van in the left lane of westbound I-10. Both vehicles burst into flames.

The accident occurred at milepost 67.8, a few miles west of the interchange with Salome Road.

The Liverpool-based duo released its debut album, "Invitation to Her's," last year.

The record company said in a statement: "We are all heartbroken. Their energy, vibrancy and talent came to define our label."

Previous accidents

A year ago last week, another wrong-way accident on I-10 in La Paz County left three people dead. On March 24, 2018, an eastbound vehicle entered westbound I-10 at Milepost 31, which is near the interchange with U.S. Route 60. That vehicle collided head-on with another vehicle about 500 feet from the exit ramp.

Another wrong-way driver on I-10 was killed Feb. 14, 2018 near Quartzsite. The DPS attempted a traffic stop on a car that fled at high speed from the scene. The car crossed the median and collided head-on with a semi-truck. It was later determined the driver of the car was wanted in connection with a homicide in California earlier that day.

Arizona has seen a large number of incidents and accidents involving wrong-way drivers in recent years. In a story on ktar.com in late December 2017, Col. Frank Milstead, the head of the DPS, said there were 1,721 such incidents in 2017. That was up from 1,589 in 2016.

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